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Press release : Countryside to be lost as 165 new houses approved in Hambleton

Site of new houses, Arthurs Lane, Hambleton Site of new houses, Arthurs Lane, Hambleton Photo: © Jackie Copley

Thursday 2 March 2017.

Both the Lancashire Branch of the Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE) and local residents were disappointed by the decision of Wyre Borough Council to approve the application yesterday for development by Gladman Homes of 165 homes on farmland at Arthurs Lane, Hambleton.

The countryside charity had recommended that the Council’s Planning Committee refuse the application based on multiple adverse grounds including impact on rural character, especially the loss of high-grade farmland (a local asset), visual harm, loss of tranquillity, and effects on important wildlife habitat, including that of Pink Footed Geese.

Local councillors and local residents also made convincing representations concerning local flooding, road safety, lack of school places and other vital community services, such as doctors and bus services.

Many members of the Planning Committee actually agreed that the development of the site would exacerbate the identified local problems. Nevertheless, they waved the application through, as no statutory consultee, such as the Environment Agency or Lancashire County Council’s Highway Authority, had formally objected.

The Government’s National Planning Policy Framework dictates that in such cases where a Council has no adopted local plan in place and/or it cannot demonstrate a five year housing land supply there should be a clear presumption in favour of development. Unfortunately, Wyre Borough Council does not have an adopted local plan.

CPRE Lancashire’s Planning Manager Jackie Copley said:

“Even though Wyre Borough Council has approved more than two thousand houses to be built in the last two years, it still can’t prove it has performed well in terms of its housing land supply. In the absence of an adopted local plan there was little the Planning Committee could do.

The Committee did however impose planning conditions to address flood risk, road safety, visual impacts, and the provision of school places in the village.

The Council must adopt a robust and sound local plan as soon as possible to stop further loss of countryside in the future.”

ENDS

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